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History and FAQ



Is this game affiliated with the original series?


No, this is not a commercial project. Not one penny is being made from this. This is a fan-made game created for family, friends, and other fans who’ve enjoyed “Space Quest” – but is in no way associated with the developers or copyright holders of the original Space Quest series. You can support the original games by buying them from Activision.


How does this fit into the “Space Quest” canon?


The beauty of it is, the game isn’t meant to. Because of all the cease-and-desist letters roaming around, I decided to write this as an original game should I ever be legally forced to drop the ‘Space Quest’ aspect of the story. This meant cutting out as much fan-service as possible, and making very few references to the original games (of course, I couldn’t completely avoid it at times.) The game was written to act as if the player never played the previous games – and this includes making Roger forget about the complicated events from “Space Quest 4.”

Still, if you’re a die-hard SQ fan who needs answers: SQInc exists on an alternate timeline created from the alternate ending in “Vohaul Strikes Back,” which is in turn a sequel to the alternate unfinished “Space Quest 7″ fan-game. This means “Incinerations” is an alternate-alternate version of the non-existent “Space Quest 9.”

Here’s a graph to explain it.

So if you’re planning on playing both “Vohaul Strikes Back” and “Incinerations” (and why wouldn’t you?), we recommend playing VSB first for the best experience to see how the games tie together.


What happened with the first “Incinerations”?


In 1999-2000, shortly after the cancellation of “Space Quest 7,” I attempted to assemble a team of fans from the Subspace Channel to create a new Space Quest game. At the time, the game actually garnered a lot of support and we soon had dozens of people itching to work on it.

Unfortunately the project also became one the earliest examples of failed fan-games. As project lead, I made the mistake of admitting one too many writers, never setting deadlines, failing to find any committed artists, and falling back on a lot of amateur mistakes. It took over a year before the script was finished, and after that, nobody was interested in working on it anymore.

All the information surrounding the original version of the game can be found in this Space Quest Omnipedia entry.


Why did you revive the project?


I ask myself that every day. :P

Back in 2005, I was working janitor duty at West Edmonton Mall. During that time, there was a two-week period where I was painting the back hallways behind the Laser Tag room – and I was subjected to two solid weeks of listening to the “Halo 2″ soundtrack on repeat. Normally, that would drive most people insane, but for me, listening to anything on repeat sometimes gets the creative juices flowing.

At some point, I recalled my old fan-game and the music got me re-imagining it as a modern sci-fi thriller. And because I’d been going to school to learn 3D Animation and already had two fan-games under my belt, I thought it might be a fun experiment to try reviving the project by myself. So I learned some AGS programming, made a couple rooms, a couple cut-scenes, and… it seemed easy enough at the time, so I just kept going.

Six years and a hundred mental breakdowns later, I finally learned the meaning of the word “scope.”


Who all worked on this game?


For the longest time, it was just myself. I handled all the writing, most of the programming and all of the animation. The first person to assist me was Akril who designed some of the earlier characters. In around 2009, Frederik Olsen offered to compose the game’s music, and in early 2011, Matthew Chastney and Peter Engel signed up to help compose the rest of the game’s massive soundtrack.

In the final stages, I would outsource a lot of help from assorted people (all of whom are properly credited.) Working with Andres and Patrick in VSB, I was able to implement some of their more advanced code into the game, and working with the folks at TSL and my last job enabled me to borrow some models and rigs. I also found several free 3D models scattered across the internet which I used to fill out the game’s backgrounds and props. And of course, there’s the beta-testing team.

In spite of the small development team, this game owes a lot to many tiny contributions from people throughout the internet.


What does “Incinerations” mean?


in·cin·er·ate   [in-sin-uh-reyt] verb (used with object),
to burn or reduce to ashes; cremate. Meaning this game has something to do with fire.

It has other more obscure meanings in the plot, but in the earlier versions, it was just a play on the title “Star Trek: Generations”. At this point it might as well be “Matrix: Revolutions” or any other “Sci-Fi Franchise: ______ions” title.


Where is the voice pack?


This version doesn’t come with a voice pack. A later version might if the community continues to show interest in one (and be willing to lend a hand in recording it). It’ll have to wait until I’m finished with my other projects, though.


How do you make the graphics?


All of the 3D graphics are developed in Maya and composited in After Effects. In fact, the 2D cell-shading is a post-production effect created by mixing software and vector renders (there’s no special shaders involved.) The explosions and other special effects are created in Particle Illusion.

As far as actual animation goes, I’ve been studying animation for a very long time. My experience includes training at DevStudios, learning from professionals at the Vancouver Film School, creating a few animated shorts, working at a small game company, and being a lead animator for “Vohaul Strikes Back” and “The Silver Lining.


How does this fit into the “Space Quest” canon?


The beauty of it is, the game isn’t meant to. Because of all the cease-and-desist letters roaming around, I decided to write this as an original game should I ever be legally forced to drop the ‘Space Quest’ aspect of the story. This meant cutting out as much fan-service as possible, and making very few references to the original games (of course, I couldn’t completely avoid it at times.) The game was written to act as if the player never played the previous games – and this includes making Roger forget about the complicated events from “Space Quest 4.”

Still, if you’re a die-hard SQ fan who needs answers: SQInc exists on an alternate timeline created from the alternate ending in “Vohaul Strikes Back,” which is in turn a sequel to the alternate unfinished “Space Quest 7″ fan-game. This means “Incinerations” is an alternate-alternate version of the non-existent “Space Quest 9.”

Here’s a graph to explain it.


Are there other Space Quest fan-games?


Of course! You can play Vohaul Strikes Back! It’s a predecessor to SQInc that I’ve been working on with Team VSB (who helped out on this game in turn), and is immensely huge for a fan-game. There’s also the “Space Quest 2 Remake” from Infamous Adventures if you want to revisit the old games in sparkly new hi-def VGA!


Will you be making another game?


I’ve said it before with “DucktaleZ 3,” and I’ll say it again: not a chance. ;)

January 11 2012 01:26 am